AIS WEBSITE

My DiscussionAIS WEBSITE
safia Khan asked 14 years ago

It appears that quite a number of the membership visits this site.The mission of the Amrohvi who has started this website is commendable. It seems that the intention is to ‘connect’ Amrohvis outside of the subcontinent and to provide education and better health for our relatives in Amroha who ‘survive day to day’ rather then ‘live
‘. Do you have suggestions to improve the website and ways to help the mission of this society? Perhaps we should provide some feed back, encouragement and new ideas to fullfill the mission of this society.

Maryam Jahan replied 14 years ago

I also want to add my appreciation for the website. Newsetters are very interesting and informative.I love photos. More personal stories and particpation in Discussion will make it more interesting.

Nargis Siddiqui replied 14 years ago

I like this Discussion section.It is an excellent way to exchange ideas.Love to hear more human stories of my fellow Amrohivis,particularly about the challenges that they had to face.

waseem Siddiqui replied 14 years ago

Like others I also enjoy visiting the website. I am very proud to be a Amrohivi. To look at the Directory makes me vey happy by the success of my fellow Amrohivis. We seem to be every where.This Discussion section is an exellent way to express our views and share our experiences with each other. I would like to see more children’s stories like the one’s on the website.Thanks Safia for asking suggestions. I hope that more Amrohivis will accept your challenge.

safia Khan replied 14 years ago

Waseem do you have a story to share?

waseem Siddiqui replied 14 years ago

My parents came to UK from Pakistan some forty years ago. My grandparents came to Pakistan from India after partition. I have two brothers and one sister.I have never been to Amroha ut have heared a lot about it. I can speak Urdu but not very well.

safia Khan replied 14 years ago

Thank you for your response Waseem. My parents came to the UK in 1956 and my brother and I have just celebrated ’50 years’ in London. We have seen a lot of changes during that time and I am sure you and your family have too.

safia Khan replied 14 years ago

Waseem would you like to see other topics covered on the website that would give you a more insightfull picture of Amroha? Since you have not yet visited Amroha this website could perhaps give a more meaningfull picture of our hometown.
Looking forward to your comments and ideas.

Suhail Naqvi replied 14 years ago

We should have a dedicated section for Authentic recipes of Amrohvi Food, and another section for a glossary of Amrohvi terms.

There must be something common in food and language. I love tasteful food as much as I love tasteful language. I wonder if that has to do with being Amrohvi or is just a common human trait.

I have a little story about the power of tasteful food. I was visiting my cousin Dr. Qambar Raza who lives in Long Island, NY. As I entered his living room, I smelled an aroma which triggered a distinct childhood memory. The aroma was of Palak-Gosht being cooked with a little bit Kusuri methi. It was identical to that of Shaljam-Gosht my paternal grand mother used to cook. Right there, I could visualize clearly one evening when my grandfather’s family was having dinner. We were sitting in a veranda outside the Sehdari (a room with six doors) where its three doors opened. The floor of the veranda was covered with dari and a white chandni (a long sheet of cloth) was spread as dastarkhwan. All males in the family – five chahas, two phuphas, my father, my grand father, and a couple friends of my grand father – were seated in a row each along the two long sides of the dastarkhwan. My father was my grand father?s eldest son, and I am my father?s eldest son.

Shaljam-Gosht was a favorite food in that household; and my father was its biggest fan. I must have been less than three years old at that time. All kinds of green food was ghaass for me then; hence, Shaljam-Ghosht was also ghaass. Nobody corrected me, I believe now that they enjoyed me calling it ghaass. Going back to the dastrakhwan, I remember distinctly that I never sat in my designated place. I would go around everyone’s back and just stand next to them with my hand on their right shoulder and they would promptly break a small piece of roti dip it in shaljam and put it in my mouth. I would eat that with great delight and mimic their Wah! I guess everyone enjoyed that little Wah from me. I would do the rounds with everyone including my grandfather and his friends – off course with one exception – my father. I don’t have to tell you why, you can guess that yourself. Today, of all who put a little piece of roti with shaljam in my mouth that evening, only four survive.

I am sometimes amazed at how just aroma of food makes one recall such early memories. This is not unique to me, my maamoo Dr. Rehan Hasan has his own memories associated with a very simple dish his mother used to cook; those memories date back to more than 50 years ago. I am sure each of you has your own.

Suhail
Woodbridge, NJ

Ikram Naqvi replied 14 years ago

Thanks Suhail for your excellent suggestions and sharing your delightful memories of eating shaljam gosht in Amroha.
I encourage other Amrohivis to do the same.

Ram Chand replied 14 years ago

Loved Suhail’s memories of shaljam gosht.

Memories of sharing Diwali and Eid with my fellow Amrohivis still warms my heart. What a special community we are?

Shariq Hasan replied 14 years ago

Thanks Suhail for sharing your lovely memories. We dont forget those childhood memories.Why should we?

Nargis Siddiqui replied 14 years ago

Reading Suhail’s contribution brought back memories of eating Urad ki kichri with asli ghee with mooli ka achaar on palang in dhoop in winter time

Maryam Jahan replied 14 years ago

I also enjoyed Suhail’s contribution because it brought back my memories.

Tanvir Ali replied 14 years ago

I am very impressed by he AIS website.
Suhail’s story reminded me of eating Urad khichri with asli ghee and mooli ka achar in a khuwan on palang in Amroha winter dhoop.

Suhail Naqvi replied 14 years ago

Hello Tanvir,

What is Khuwan?

I remember eating Urad-ki-Khichdi with my mother’s cousin (my Mamoo, Mualana Shakir in Lucknow) about three years ago in February. My mamoo, was very particular about Garlic-and-green-chilli chutni being grated (not ground). Of course, there was mooli-ka-achaar with round and fat slices of mooli soaked in sour raaee-water with a slight flavor of ginger. There was desi ghee, but these days people use vegetable butter also (Amul butter – the most popular Indian butter). I personally prefer Amul butter to Desi ghee – mostly because of its salty taste.

Suhail
Woodbridge, NJ

Tanvir Ali replied 14 years ago

Sorry Suhail, I should have explained KHUWAN. This was a large round flat article made of metal

Family sat around it with their personal khichri.

Suhail Naqvi replied 14 years ago

oooh! Yes. I know now – I was pronouncing it wrong and that made if difficult for me to connect it. It is a large round heavy metallic tray.

waseem Ahmad replied 14 years ago

Fantastic news about the cataracts operation of poor Amroha people. Please tell me how I can help financially. May be some kind of sponsorship like scholarships might be a good idea.

Maryam Jahan replied 14 years ago

I am delighted to know about AIS organizing camps in Amroha for the cataracts operations for poor people. I would like to help.

Tanvir Ali replied 14 years ago

Good to read about the cataracts operaion in Amroha.Would like to know more about it.